Anti-wrinkle cream claims may not be true

While walking along Burke Road a myriad of advertisements claim to be the elixir of youth in the form of moisturising creams, enticing the matrons of Camberwell who are regulars along the shopping strip. With crevices deeper than the Grand Canyon caused by an Aussie lifestyle before “Slip, Slop Slap” adverts, drinking beer and eating […]

While walking along Burke Road a myriad of advertisements claim to be the elixir of youth in the form of moisturising creams, enticing the matrons of Camberwell who are regulars along the shopping strip.

With crevices deeper than the Grand Canyon caused by an Aussie lifestyle before “Slip, Slop Slap” adverts, drinking beer and eating carcinogenic sausages, they seem oblivious to the fact it is scientifically impossible for any moisturizing cream to perform a miracle on a par with the second coming. However, that doesn’t stop hundreds trying.

“I did it!  I admit it!  I wanted to look younger and when I saw the before and after photos I truly believed that it would work.  I spent over $100 on a little pot of cream that said it would make me look younger within 10 days… well it’s been 20 now and I can’t see any difference!” cried a geriatric Camberwell matron.

The false advertising is causing misery and using up valuable economic resources that could used on Spanx and prune juice; two products that have been proven to make a positive impact on this particular demographic.

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