Accused look more guilty with bad haircut – random taxpayer funded study

Flying in the face of the belief that everyone is innocent until proven guilty, terrible haircuts influence the general public’s opinion long before a sentence is passed. “An average member of the public makes up their mind about you in 5 seconds. This is more likely to be negative if you have a shocking haircut […]

Flying in the face of the belief that everyone is innocent until proven guilty, terrible haircuts influence the general public’s opinion long before a sentence is passed.

“An average member of the public makes up their mind about you in 5 seconds. This is more likely to be negative if you have a shocking haircut and are being accused of a crime with a big sensationalist headline to go along with it,” explains Prof. B. Lowehard from Deakin University’s C.S.I unit.

“If we look at Phil Spector’s style people immediately have a natural bias due to him looking extremely dodgy.”

The study has shown that this first impression is extremely misleading as people having very conservative hairstyles are more than capable of anti-social activity.

Given a picture of well-known people in Australian society people in the study were asked to say what type of person they thought they were.  One child thought Malcolm Turnbull was a “meanie” and “would give bad Christmas presents” while another felt Pauline Hanson was “scary”. When shown a picture of Bill Shorten with his wife, many people had a quizzical “How did he get her?” look on their faces.

 

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